Why Did Governor Gavin Newsom Veto A "Critical Race Theory" Education Bill?

California Governor Gavin Newsom is an unlikely ally in the fight against the anti-white critical race theory, but yesterday he shocked and confused his colleagues with a surprise veto of Assembly Bill 331

AB 331, which passed 62 to 12 in California's State Assembly, would've mandated students in the Golden State's failing high schools to take a "Critical Ethnic Studies" class about the oppression and discrimination faced by one of four minority groups (African-Americans, "Latinx," Native Americans and Asian-Americans) at the hands of white supremacists. A special emphasis on forcing white students to take these classes was emphasized in the law's discussion. 

While AB 331 was passed in January 2019, Newsom's veto has the optical misfortune of coinciding with Donald Trump's current campaign seeking to put an end to critical race theory in federally funded institutions. The bill's sponsor, Assemblyman Jose Medina, lashed out at his fellow Democrat, calling the Governor's move “a failure to push back against the racial rhetoric and bullying of Donald Trump.”

So why did he do it? 

The answer lies in Newsom's donors, who also happen to be members of prominent Jewish ethnic lobbies. For example, the American Jewish Committee responded to news of his decision with a "Bravo."  

Jewish groups protested AB 331 because, while they agreed with the anti-white message, they also resented the lack of an exemption for Jewish students. Under the law, Jews would be considered "white" and not allowed to choose Jewish Studies for their credit.  

Roselyn Swig, a billionaire heiress, wrote an op-ed reflecting this sentiment four days ago. In the piece, she urges that the bill be altered. 

According to Swig, critical race theory is "crucial to ensure a tradition of tolerance, understanding and respect – three of my core values – for future generations, while advancing justice for marginalized communities." However, she furiously contested that "[An] initial draft of the educational plan had both excluded Jews and antisemitism education, and included anti-Jewish tropes in lyrics and anti-Israel boycotts." 

Swig concluded her open letter by stating that the "interests of the Jewish community are actually aligned with other ethnic studies groups. We should come together to advance our shared values, both in the classroom and beyond, for years to come." 

The proposed ethnic studies curriculum tried to adapt to these demands, but the end result only enraged Jews further. The final version on Newsom's desk would've taught that Jews were beneficiaries of "white privilege," which doomed it. 

While non-white groups who supported the bill will blame Newsom's own "white privilege" for its failure, the final decision was made outside of the Governor's office.

Swig belongs to what California media has dubbed Newsom's "Faithful Eight" -- eight wealthy families who have given the Governor millions of dollars to transform him from mediocre dog catcher to a national figure with future presidential ambitions.

Of the Faithful Eight, the Swig's are joined by four other elite Jewish dynasties: the Guggenhimes, the Marcus', the Fishers, and the Pritzkers. 

While California has earned a reputation for its radical left policies, it also suffers from Progressive Except Palestine syndrome. In 2016, Governor Jerry Brown signed one of the most draconian and controversial anti-BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions) bills in the country. 

The lesson for white privilege peddlers who saw AB 331 as a political lay up is simple: real power always strikes back.