Lawsuit Portrays "Anti-Racist" Hustler Christian Picciolini as a Gangster and Fraud

Picciolini began running afoul of the business's code of conduct and professional standards when, according to the court documents, the man whose brand revolves around using "kindness" to get nationalist activists to give up was actually just threatening "white supremacists" to try and get them to leave to help raise his profile. This introduced an element of liability to LAH. 

An ongoing lawsuit filed last year by Christian Picciolini's former organization, Life After Hate, accuses him of fraud, blackmail and extortion. 

Life After Hate, Inc v. Free Radicals Project, Inc & Christian Picciolini seeks damages for the theft of intellectual property and the use of the LAH brand to raise funds that Picciolini allegedly siphoned off for himself. 

According to the complaint, LAH was founded in 2011 by defendant Picciolini and plaintiffs Arno Michaelis, Sammy Rangel, Angela King and Frank Meeink, who started the business in hopes of commercializing their pasts as members of a skinhead street gang. They sought to copy models in Europe, where "ex-racists" are paid large consulting fees to lecture about how white people do not have a right to participate in identity politics like every other group.   

No Honor Among Grifters  

In 2015, Picciolini apparently failed to get a job with the government so he decided to become the full time Chairman of LAH. During this process, the group hired a marketing firm called GravityTank, then began a sub-division called "ExitUSA." Picciolini purchased the domain out of his own pocket on behalf of the organization. 

But after the Department of Homeland Security allocated a massive $400,000 grant to LAH in June 2016, Picciolini started making moves. Just a few months later, he transferred the groups digital assets to his own personal account without anyone else's knowledge.

Threats and Coercion 

Picciolini began running afoul of the business's code of conduct and professional standards when, according to the court documents, the man whose brand revolves around using "kindness" to get nationalist activists to give up was actually just threatening "white supremacists" to try and get them to leave to help raise his profile. This introduced an element of liability to LAH. 

On social media, Picciolini is accused of embarrassing LAH by posting inflammatory political commentary commonly associated with left-wing extremist groups he appears to have some fondness for. When told to stop, Picciolini incited petty, public internet feuds with his business partners.

Blackmail and Extortion 

In August 2017, Picciolini's last straw was allegedly publicizing information about a rape victim. After this, LAH's board suspended him and ordered he transfer all the digital assets in his possession. 

A week later, Picciolini demanded he get to keep the ExitUSA division of LAH and get paid $50,000 to go away. When he didn't get his way, he promised his partners that they would suffer consequences from the organizations wealthy donors. Picciolini appears to have enjoyed an intimate relationship with the Jewish never ending money tree at the Anti-Defamation League well into 2017. He said he would go out of his way to confuse their investors. 

Plaintiffs accuse the defendant of, after not getting his way, fooling people into thinking they were donating to Life After Hate when it was all for him. After Picciolini's attempt to register ExitUSA was deemed fraudulent by the patent office, his organization became known as "Free Radicals Project, Inc." 

A Dog-Eat-Dog Industry 

The fight for the bag of "anti-racist" money seems to be heating up. There are lots of racoons but a handful of trash cans. 

A lawsuit filed last August as Capitol Indemnity Corporation v. Picciolini, et al, which we could not obtain due to it being sealed, puts Picciolini in the defendants seat yet again. The plaintiff is an insurance company.

Currently, Picciolini is in the middle of a feud with another competing business, Light Upon Light, which seems to be profitably ingratiating itself to government and police agencies. 

Light Upon Light, which employs former members of Al Qaeda and now Jeff Schoep, ex leader of the National Socialist Movement, seems to be more consistent in its condemnation of extremism. Picciolini recently "called out" Schoep for condemning anarchist and communist paramilitary violence. 

One particularly inflammatory accusation from Light Upon Light is that Picciolini plagiarized some of his story and outreach philosophy from Frank Meeinke, a man who co-founded Life After Hate with Picciolini. Messages and videos reviewed by National Justice where Picciolini "intervenes" with white nationalists suggest that Picciolini's "kill them with kindness" approach he publicly endorses is not what he has actually utilized.

Like in the Soviet Union, the political re-education industry in America attracts many people of low moral character. To the extent Christian Picciolini did victimize people as a "Nazi," this is more to due with personal moral failings than the ethical-social philosophy of Adolf Hitler and Joseph Goebbels, who preached honor, family and altruism. We will continue to report on this controversy between competing businesses as it evolves.