Convicted Pedophile and 'Antifa' Activist Is an Associated Press Photojournalist

If a photojournalist was accused of sympathizing with the alt-right, AFP and AP would catch that in a background check or immediately release a public statement condemning them if they were informed afterwards. 

But a sex offender who preyed on kids and is personally involved in extreme-left activism he is supposed to be reporting on? Hard to believe, but this is not a deal breaker for employment in news gathering at prestigious wire services tasked with framing stories copied by most major publications, including conservative ones. 

A man convicted of committing a sexual offense with a 13-year-old girl is a Philadelphia-based anarchist and professional photographer, National Justice can confirm. 

40-year-old Cory Vernon Clark (born Yehudah Kalman) has his work featured prominently on a number of mainstream media outlets. He is a contributing photojournalist to the Associated Press, AFP, Sipa Press and has almost 1700 pro-Antifa propaganda images on media service Getty, credited under the name Cory Clark. Clark specializes in photographic propaganda glorifying left-wing extremists, and for the last several years has been a fixture at anarchist and communist events in Eastern Pennsylvania and Washington DC. He is one of a handful of journalists anarchist groups like Philly Antifa and Smash Racism DC allow to film them because they know he is on their side. 

He was also instrumental in "doxing" people at previous National Policy Institute events going back to 2013. His high quality photographs were provided to Daryle Lamont Jenkins with the intention of identifying young men attending the conference and later harassing them. Here is an image of him outside the National Press Club in 2013 during an "Antifa" protest:

 

Clark's company, Lawless Media LLC, is run jointly with his wife Dani Finger. On their website they explain that the business' mission is to use their cameras to aid in the construction of leftist political narratives, rather than report news objectively:

 For years I have sought to capture the struggles of people fighting not just for their freedom, but their lives and the lives of their families and communities. I have sought to capture the struggle for their humanity and against indignity and injustice, for something more than, day to day survival, for a future. Many of these images have been or are a part of specific projects, some have been published others have been distributed via social media or have been exhibited in art exhibitions.  

This is the rule, rather than the exception, when looking at how the press works in the United States and much of the liberal West.

The infiltration of  extremists and deviants like Clark into liberal media has discredited self-chosen information gatekeepers and caused the public to lose faith in the "institution." There are many cases like this.   

On Clark's merchandise website, he sells materials like "White Supremacy is Terrorism" and a "Fuck You Pig" t-shirt, a portrait of Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello, and an artistic print of two masked female "antifa" black bloc members. 

If a photojournalist was accused of sympathizing with the alt-right, AFP and AP would catch that in a background check or immediately release a public statement condemning them if they were informed afterwards. 

But a sex offender who preyed on kids and is personally involved in extreme-left activism he is supposed to be reporting on? Hard to believe, but this is not a deal breaker for employment in news gathering at prestigious wire services tasked with framing stories copied by most major publications, including conservative ones.